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, the rebels control the border post which makes them a target. at the u.n. security council, the paralysis caused by the desire of france, britain and america, to remove the regime in russia and china cost support of it means a struggle to release a statement. >> this is a great concern. turkey is a core ally of the united states and this sort of cross border military activity is very destabilizing and must be stopped. >> syria takes seriously the vote in turkey and the vote authorizing military action. >> in cases of border incidents, that happened between any two neighboring countries, states and governments should act wisely, rationally and responsibly. >> but on syrian state tv, the incident with turkey was not mentioned. it called for a combination of rebel attacks. the russian foreign minister who says he does not want sutton regime change is watching president." assad tossed back, vital for the regime's survival. >> the conflict in syria took on a cross border damaged a long time ago. pick it is being pulled from the outside. >> all syria's neighbors are being drawn into the conflic
to the target was made up in the 1960's based on figures from the 1940's. when the u.n. look at these figures and said it should be served. 4%. -- 0.4%. >> in a sense it does not matter. it is the policy. i do not believe it is about that but i understand the argument. it is a policy of all three major parties of the last election and so what is happening now is the enactment of democracy. when you go out and talk to the public -- just a year ago, when people were asked the question in a fair way, not, given the recession, can we possibly afford -- >> that was some time ago. support is falling. these millionaires are not paying their fault amount of tax. and they want them to spend money that does not work. they have been shown not to work. >> the same amount of money was to -- page to disasters, you would not have a problem? >> when you have a disaster, it causes chaos on the ground. groups like msf, who are good in these situations, have a huge problem because there is so much money around and there are so many charities exploiting this. >> people are campaigning on these issues and no this
. the u.n. -- the united states classifies hamas as a terrorist organization. now, the group which controls gaza has been accused of torture, police brutality, and arbitrary arrest. the criminal justice system reeks of injustice according to human-rights watch. there has been isolated cases of abuse. they deny that it is systematic. our correspondent reports >> security forces in action. soon after they came to power in late 2007. human-rights watched says that police brutality remains a problem not only in the streets but inside the prisons. >> in this report we found that the authorities are arbitrarily detain people, to nine people access to the lawyers, and torturing people. in the worst cases are executing people based on a concession that was given under torture. we spoke to one young vocal opponent has been arbitrarily arrested dozens of times over the last five years. >> this continued for several days. they burned my foot with a cigarette lighter. another help to me down and they burned me again. >> in the prisons, this is not uncommon according to the report. unusually, h
. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they called this uprising from the very beginning. they depicted it as driven by foreign elements, as a conspiracy against the syrian people, against the syrian nation
to protect the great barrier reef. the u.n. says that unless more is done, the reef risks losing its world heritage list davis. this would turn into a political and ecological disaster. it has just been stand by google. are these pictures about to go from being an up-to-date window on the "masterpiece to a collection for an archive? >> a thrilling sport tradition or a crow and antiquated form of entertainment? in mexico, the debate is raging on whether to ban bullfighting. >> it is still one of the most controversial past times in the americas. bullfighting has been practiced in mexico since the time of the conquistadores, but its days might now be numbered. last year, a proposed ban in the mexican capital only felt at the final hurdle. this time around, the activists are convinced that the legislation will pass. following a partial ban in countries like peru and ecuador, this, the largest bullring in the world in mexico as potential the next site to be closed down. that is something that these fans and the workers here are desperate to avoid. this has been in the hernandez family for five
. one they don't want what they see i a repeat of libya, u.s. ad west going behind the u.n. resolution. >> or being on the side line and the language of the u.n. resolution was expanded beyond what -- >> the second thing, they are also saying they don't want to substitute an al white dick aloe white dictator and that is a ridiculous point, it is not a ridiculous point because the truth of the sectarian divisions that exist within syria, there has to be found a way for those countries to, for those communities -- >> you agree with the russians -- >> look, the russians -- >> wha what don't you agree wit? >> their concern is not a stupid one, and that doesn't justify what they have done because they have stood in the way in a bellicose way, mainly because of this point they don't want the west to be seen to get a victory and in the end -- >> and they also want to be a player? >> they do, look they want to be dealt with like a superpower and the best way to do that is to be positive contributors to the international system and not blockers. >> but i mean, foreign minister lap i don't have
" group along the sidelines of the u.n. general assembly meeting. two of syria's key allies, russia and china, were not included in the talks. clinton said the u.s. was offering the opposition an additional $45 million in non- lethal and humanitarian aid. she also used the opportunity to single out iran for aiding forces loyal to president bashar al-assad. 's most important lifeline is iran. last week a senior iranian official publicly acknowledged that members of the iranian revolutionary guard corp. are operating inside syria. there is no longer any doubt that tehran will do whatever it takes to protect its proxy and crony in damascus. >> sreenivasan: in washington, defense secretary leon panetta confirmed the u.s. has intelligence that shows the syrian regime has moved some of its chemical weapons to better secure them. he also said the major stockpiles at main sites are believed to be secure. in august, president obama threatened u.s. action if syria moves or uses its chemical weapons. meanwhile, in syria, the battle for control of the northern city of aleppo intensified as rebe
, am bush, we believe that with our partners, again, a great public private partnership, u.n. women, is a partner of ours in this initiative, and many others, and we will achieve that number of 5 million, and here is another great example, where this is connected once again, not just to our water neutrality, not just to us are, our belief of stronger sustainable community, but also to that initiative of 5 by 20. >> rose: when you go into a country whether it is africa or asia or latin america, wherever it might be, what is the breakdown in terms of hiring, in terms of local versus outside, in terms of men versus women? meaning the comparisons. >> in terms of local versus outside? >> rose: what is the goal? >> well in terms of local versus outside it is almost all local. >> rose: right. >> so we are a local business that hires locally, that produces locally, distributes locally, sells locally and pays taxes locally. >> rose: all right. the developing markets have become huge for you, even more so than north america or not? >> well, let me just put it into perspective. the three and a
. >> ( translated ): thorough our ambassador we maintain contacts with syria and they assure us also through the u.n.'s special envoy for syria mr. lakhdar ibrahimi that it is a tragic incident, such incidents will not be repeated in the future. scuffles outside the turkish parliament in ankara, only a few protested, but many turks fear war erupting with their neighbor. once a friend, now deemed an enemy. inside the chamber, m.p.s granted the government powers to send troops over the border but that looks unlikely. by this evening the syrians had done exactly what the russians asked. inside syria, the war grows ever more bitter. neighboring countries and world powers have picked sides and are providing arms and other support, but as the u.n. security council meets tonight to discuss a resolution on yesterday's shelling, it's clear that no-one, least of all turkey and syria, wants the war to spill over the border. >> woodruff: for more on this i'm joined now by henri barkey-- a specialist in turkish affairs and a former state department official in the clinton administration. he now teaches at lehigh
and other new residents. and economically. u.n.c. professor and long time political reporter says north carolina is moving in two directions at once >> the up escalator in this state is the economic diversification into higher-wage, higher-skill, research and development, biotechnology. the down escalator is the collapse of the traditional industries of textiles, tobacco and furniture. and the elevation of the unemployment rate. >> brown: you can see the dividing lines everywhere. in downtown durham where an old tobacco plant is now an upscale historic district, home to restaurants and businesses with an art center and the durham bulls' athletic park across the way. while some 80 miles away in more rural rocky mount, old textile plants and mills sit shuttered. all this, he says, plays into the state's divided politics >> where the republicans have gained in this state is particularly among blue-collar people and rural people that in the older south used to be democrats. >> brown: romney ads address the job losses directly >> here in north carolina, we're not better off under president o
captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie has the night off. there's almost $3 trillion in u.s. mutual fund money markets. regulators want to make them safer. the third quarter ends for investors. it's been a good quarter and it could get better if history is any guide. then the c.e.o. of platinum miner stillwater mining joins us. global demand and why platinum is cheaper than gold. that and more tonight on n.b.r.! an unusually public battle over money market regulation begins our broadcast time. the debate is testing the regulatory structure put in place by the dodd-frank financial reforms after the credit crisis. under pressure from treasury secretary timothy geithner, the new financial stability oversight council is making a strong push for controversial rules aimed at preventing a run on what many think of as a safer place for investors to put their money. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: for an investment designed to be as boring as possible, money market funds have set off a fierce regulatory battle. last month, the s.e.
>> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone, i'm susie gharib. american factories were going all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and ou
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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